In today’s technology-based world, chances are you’ve heard of the “cloud” or “cloud storage.” In fact, nearly 90-percent of all U.S. broadband users acknowledge that cloud computing exists, yet just 29-percent knowingly utilize the technology. However, with cloud technology becoming more applicable and relevant with each passing day, these statistics are expected to soar over the coming years and more people will turn to the cloud for storing data, files, media and more.

Though the prevalence of the cloud has added ease, accessibility, and reliability to computing, it’s brought with it a slew of new threats and risks. As you begin to rely more and more on cloud computing, be aware of these 5 security threats and how you can fix them.

 

Absence of Adequate Encryption

The risk:

Without proper encryption, cloud computing is often subjected to monitoring and eavesdropping by external sources like common Man-in-the-Middle (MitM) attacks. By impersonating critical aspects of the cloud computing process and bypassing authentication methods, hackers are able to access and hijack critical, “secure” data.

The solution:

You can prevent this risk by encrypting communications and data with proper SSL/TLS code. By implementing cryptographic protocols and endpoint authentication, and by using a reliable proxy server, you can shield your cloud data from random attacks.

 

Feeble Security Management

The risk:

Cloud systems with weak security management will obviously be more subjected to external threats and risks. Poor security includes things such as failure to engage strong authentication measures, identity management and authorization procedures and more.

The solution:

In order to reliably manage the security of your cloud computing system, you have to synchronize data and use proper identity management services so that all systems in the cloud are able to work together. You should also establish an in-house backup system to store critical data that might be inappropriate for the cloud alone. Lastly, it’s critical for you to have real-time, end-to-end visibility so that you’ll be able to see each level of the network and quickly recognize and resolve security weaknesses.

 

Poor Data Redundancy

The risk:

Without adequate data redundancy, your entire cloud – and therefore your entire business – will be at risk. You’ll be even more vulnerable to external threats if you fail to have additional copies of your data distributed across data centers across the network.

The solution:

In order to implement redundancy, you must use various data centers from both a single cloud provider, multiple public cloud providers, and a hybrid cloud. Distributing data this way will ensure that there is minimal damage in the event of an outage or breach in one data center.

 

Poor IP Protection


The risk:

Your IP (intellectual property) must have the highest encryption and security protocols in place if you wish to fend off external security threats. Similarly, your IP needs to be identified and classified in order to determine and recognize risks.

The solution:

Make sure your system is not entirely automated. By operating some tasks manually, you can quickly classify data and better identify IP risks. You should also know what types of threats your cloud computing system faces and use cloud security services provider or detailed threat model to follow in the event of a breach. Lastly, ensure that you have a secure network infrastructure, that you implement a permission matrix, that you solidify open-source components, and that you regularly conduct third-party audits.

 

Data Leak


The risk:

Data can be easily compromised, changed, destroyed, or maliciously accessed without the proper security protocols in place. Cloud security service providers that operate in worker-driver BYOD environments are at even more of a risk of data leakages because their systems can be easily breached.

The solution:

When working with a cloud provider, be sure you communicate openly and ask important questions regarding data leak coverage, data loss prevention and more. Never assume this type of security is applied and always ask for agreements in writing. Implemented security measures should always be able to stand up to malfunctions, breaches, errors and more.

 


Editor’s Note: This blog article was written by an outside contributor – a guest blogger – for the purpose of posting for our readers. However, the opinions and recommendations expressed in this guest blog are solely those of the contributor, and do not necessarily reflect those of The Security Awareness Company, LLC. If you are interested in writing something for us, please do not hesitate to contact us: blog@thesecurityawarenesscompany.com.

James Straatman

Cloud Security Expert at Lightstream
James is a cloud security expert with 5+ years of experience making cloud servers safe and easy to access for companies. In his free time, he enjoys camping and fishing.

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